Jon Chamberlain - Researcher in Computer Science and Marine Biology

Jon Chamberlain - Researcher in Computer Science and Marine Biology

Picture of a Manta Ray taken in Thailand 2007

Manta Ray

This photo was taken during a spectacular dive in Koh Boh, Similian Islands, Thailand. As we decended to a coral ledge we realised we were being circled by 5 or 6 huge manta rays.

The Devil Ray

The manta or giant ray (Manta birostris) can grow up to 7.6m across the wing span and is the largest of the rays. They have a pair of flexible cephalic fins that they use to direct plankton, small fish and water into its mouth. These fins look like horns, hence why they became known as devil rays.

Symbiotic relations

Mantas frequent cleaning stations where wrasse and other cleaning fish remove parasites and dead skin. Their graceful wings can sometimes provide shelter for a ramora which will swim and feed along with manta. Unfortunately manta rays have a Near Threatened conservation status.
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